The Winds of Change in South America

by Maria-Jose Alvear For more than fifteen years, extreme left-wing governments have ruled several countries in South America in an attempt to combat extreme inequality, poverty and concentration of income. Recently, however, an inadequate management of the economy has caused recessions and social unrest in countries run by populist administrations. The outcomes of two important…

Un Cuba Libre Por Favor…

by Quentin Pache In many ways, Cuba lives up to its reputation. White beaches, delicious rum, tasty cigars, old cars and passionate salsa – tourists can definitely enjoy them all when traveling to the biggest island of the Caribbean. But Cuba is above all the spirit of la revolución, the U.S. embargo and the last…

Limes, Drugs and Mexican Mafia

by Kaleb Warnock A few weeks ago I was scouring the Brunnenmarkt for limes for a Sriracha noodle recipe I was experimenting with, but noticed something rather peculiar: despite my exhaustive efforts, I turned up nothing. There were lemons, grapefruits, every variety of oranges and numerous other citrus fruits I couldn’t identify – but not a…

How the Great Chemist’s War Brought About the Substitution of Guano

by Lisa Butzenlechner World War I is sometimes referred as the “chemist’s war” due to the prevalence of poison gas warfare, including the use of massive amounts of nitrogen. It proved to be the beginning of a fundamental change in the world’s ecological relation with nitrogen, according to Gregory Cushman, Associate Professor for history at…

Rio de Janeiro: The Marvelous City

by Ekaterina Nikolaeva My plane landed in Rio de Janeiro at night, and as I was flying from Sao Paulo, the aircraft made the famous curve over the Guanabara Bay, offering a breathtaking view of the city on its way to the centrally located Santos Dumont Airport. As I gazed out of the plane window,…